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bluetoes591
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Feb 21, 2010 8:11 am

Michopsychology wrote: I might go to school one province to the west. I had to be sure to spell the University of British Colombia correctly, since I was also applying to Columbia University in New York.
Psst. That's University of British Columbia. :wink:
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Feb 22, 2010 7:55 am

bluetoes591 wrote:
Michopsychology wrote: I might go to school one province to the west. I had to be sure to spell the University of British Colombia correctly, since I was also applying to Columbia University in New York.
Psst. That's University of British Columbia. :wink:
Right, thanks for correcting me. Maybe it was the inclusion or exclusion of the word "British" that I had to remember.
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Apr 04, 2010 12:39 pm

Ellen Page: 'I'm totally pro-choice. I mean what are we going to do – go back to clothes hangers?'

The young star of Juno on abortion, learning to roller derby with Smother Theresa, sexism in Hollywood and going green in Halifax
by Lisa O'Kelly, The Observer, Sunday 4 April 2010

In Drew Barrymore's new film, Whip It, you play a disaffected, teenage beauty queen who discovers herself through roller derby, a rough-and-tumble form of competitive roller skating. Tell us about the character.

She's called Bliss Cavendar. She lives in a small town in Texas where she takes part in beauty pageants, and she is very much in turmoil. It's partly unconscious turmoil, because it's not like she is being forced into beauty pageants by her mother. It is more that she loves her mother and wants to please her and that becomes the strongest dilemma for her: how to establish a sense of self while still fulfilling her obligations to other people. I can identify with that. When we're growing up there are all sorts of people telling us what to do when really what we need is space to work out who to be.

Is she anything like your teenage self?

To a certain extent. I am from a small town – Halifax, Nova Scotia – and when I was 16 I finished school, moved to Toronto, started working and experienced all the freedom that Bliss is yearning for. But the funny thing for me is that now, aged 23, I'm back home and this is where I feel the most grounded and the most myself. I'm loving it, trying to squeeze as much out of the orange as I can. It usually happens to people much later in life, this return to your roots, but I guess I started out earlier than most.

The skating in Whip It is fast and furious. Did you do your own stunts?

Ninety nine per cent of them. There were a few bruises but it was so much fun. I love sport, I grew up playing sports, that's all I did, and it is so invigorating now that I'm supposedly adult to learn something completely new, from the bottom up. That doesn't often happen.

How much training did you do?

I started about four months before the film. My trainer was a real roller derby star called Axles of Evil, also known as Smother Teresa. We would meet three days a week and on top of that I was working with a personal trainer five times a week just to get physically stronger.

Roller derby can be quite violent. How did you feel about that side of the film?

I really enjoyed it. I think it is great as a girl to be able to experience that kind of controlled aggressiveness. I'm not in favour of aggression for its own sake but in this context it is empowering and liberating and at the end everybody goes out for a beer and loves each other.

The role you are best known for is the pregnant teenager in Juno which won you an Oscar nomination for best actress when you were just 20. How has your life changed since then?

That was a big turning point for me. It was very unexpected. I was used to doing small, low-budget films and this just happened to be one small low-budget film that more than 100 people saw. I found it very strange to be suddenly talking about myself all the time and to be followed down the street. But it's been a huge gift too. To be in a position, at my age, where I am financially independent, I can help develop things, I can promote stuff that I believe in, I can say no a lot and spend time writing – that is a gift. I'm also exploring projects that interest me outside the film industry.

What kind of projects?

I've become really interested in permaculture, simplifying my life and doing everything I can to develop more of a sustainable lifestyle. Last year, I spent a month in an eco-village called Lost Valley in Oregon learning about permaculture. I now want to learn more and help Nova Scotia to achieve greater sustainability. I think it is really important to act locally. The environmental situation on a global scale can feel so overwhelming.

How did you feel about the controversy aroused by your role in Juno?

I was like, you know what? You all need to calm down. People are so black and white about this. Because she kept the baby everybody said the film was against abortion. But if she'd had an abortion everybody would have been like, "Oh my God". I am a feminist and I am totally pro-choice, but what's funny is when you say that people assume that you are pro-abortion. I don't love abortion but I want women to be able to choose and I don't want white dudes in an office being able to make laws on things like this. I mean what are we going to do – go back to clothes hangers?

What do you think of the way women are treated in the movie business?

I think it's a total drag. I've been lucky to get interesting parts but there are still not that many out there for women. And everybody is so critical of women. If there's a movie starring a man that tanks, then I don't see an article about the fact that the movie starred a man and that must be why it bombed. Then a film comes out where a woman is in the lead, or a movie comes out where a bunch of girls are roller derbying, and it doesn't make much money and you see articles about how women can't carry a film.

You said in an early interview that you felt there was too much pressure on women these days to look good. Do you feel that more as you become better known?

I hate to admit it but, yeah. I definitely feel more of a sense of personal insecurity. I really try and smarten up when I feel that way but sometimes it does get to me. The fact is, young girls are bombarded by advertisements and magazines full of delusional expectations that encourage people to like themselves less and then they want to buy more things. It is really sad and it encourages the consumerist cycle. Boys used to have it slightly easier but I think they are now getting more of the same kind of pressure. Look at all the guys in junior high who think they should have a six-pack.

Did you ever think of doing anything other than acting?

I'm very interested in psychology. For a while I thought seriously about becoming a therapist for troubled children. Psychology is not too dissimilar to acting, I always think.

Source: www.guardian.co.uk
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Apr 05, 2010 6:40 am

Good article, it's been a while. Thanks for posting Dom :)
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Apr 05, 2010 7:00 am

Great article.....and yes Ellen is totally spot on about the way women are treated by Hollyowood.....Eddie Murphy can bomb on so many films....yet get more roles.

I like Ellen's support of locally-grown food and agriculture. It really has got me reading up on the subject. Although Nova Scotia is not Third World....there are some growing agricultural problems around the world....as smaller nations have stopped farming and rely solely on imports....those imported foods are getting more expensive as oil and transport becomes more expensive.

I was hoping she would have more details on the TV show she was working on with Alia and HarMar....havent heard much on it recently
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Apr 06, 2010 8:09 am

Whip It star Ellen Page on the LA roller girls
Ellen Page, the diminutive and delicate star of 2007 indie hit Juno, did not know the girls who roughed her up.
by Will Lawrence, published on April 5, 2010

She expected that it might happen – it happens to a lot of young women in the situation that she was in — but it was unsettling nevertheless. The 23-year-old Canadian actress was in Los Angeles early last year. She was downtown at one of the city’s roller-skating rinks, practising some moves for her latest movie, the Drew Barrymore-directed Whip It, when, all of a sudden, out of nowhere, a gang of armoured women swooped down upon her, knocking her about and giving her a good old jostle.

There were no punches thrown, and no one pulled any hair, but Page felt a little shaken. “I’d entered the world of the roller derby,” she says, “I was so scared; I thought I was going to vomit.”

Roller-derby is an American sport, growing in popularity, which entices teams of young women to put on their skates, helmets and pads and race around a rink. It is a contact sport and Page admits she was terrified when she was practising with real-life roller-derby team the Los Angeles Derby Dolls. “Obviously they are not going to kill me but they are ingrained mentally to play hard, so when we scrimmaged they definitely beat me up a bit.”

The rough-and-tumble of the roller-derby can trace its origins back to 1922, although it has re-remerged over the last few years (updated with a 1950s glamour girl image, lots of tattoos and a spiky, punk attitude) and its profile is about to get its biggest boost yet, with the sport providing the backdrop for Page and Barrymore’s high-energy movie.

Whip It is drawn from the book of the same name, written by author-turned-roller-derby queen Shauna Cross, and it stands as Barrymore’s directorial debut. The actress-turned-director starred in her first film at four years old, and has produced movies since her early twenties, her output including the likes of Donnie Darko and the Charlie’s Angels films. Her first piece as director spans several genres; it is, at once, a coming-of-age picture, a romantic comedy, a sport picture and a taut family drama.

“It was Drew’s first time directing, which is incredibly complex, but she’s an accomplished producer and she’s been in this business since she was four, so I think she knew how to handle all that pressure,” Page says. “She’s done an amazing job with this film. It’s very complicated, with a massive cast, big action sequences, and not a huge budget. And trying to direct actors on roller-skates? They might as well have been on horses.”

The story recounts the tale of Bliss (Page), an indie-rock-loving teenage girl in Texas who rebels against her mother’s obsession with beauty pageants and discovers friendship and love when she tumbles into the world of the roller-derby. Much like the sport itself, the story is underpinned by the notion of female empowerment and, in spite of the challenges, it is an accomplished effort, well acted by Page and a sizzling supporting cast, which includes the ever-excellent Marcia Gay Harden (who plays Page’s mum), rapper-cum-actress Eve, Saturday Night Live comedienne Kristen Wiig, and Hollywood rock chick Juliette Lewis, all of whom star alongside Barrymore as Page’s fellow derby girls.

“It’s cute and fun and has lots of different moments,” smiles Page. In person she is light and bubbly, her tiny frame all wrapped in black, and she is clearly excited by her experience on Barrymore’s movie. “And it was, honestly, the most fun I’ve ever had making a film. Drew loves to play lots of music on set, and we’d have impromptu roller-discos out on the track. Drew’s also a very giving person, too, emotionally. We’d have personal moments, especially when talking about and relating to material in a particular scene; she was always so emotionally available.”

While the film is based on the Shauna Cross novel, Barrymore has infused the script with her own personal touches, and the strained relationship between Bliss and her mum echoes the difficult relationship that the actor-turned-director has endured with her mother (at 15, Barrymore won a legal battle to free herself from her mother’s guardianship).

“It was a personal film for me,” offers Barrymore, “and once I’d met Ellen, I didn’t want anyone else to play the part. She looks so hot out there in her little hot pants racing round that track. I wanted to be greedy, and pack a lot into the movie, and Ellen was perfect.”

Page seems a little embarrassed as I pass on the compliment. “I don’t know about that,” she says. “For a start, I’d never been on roller skates before.” She pauses. “Although I had been on roller blades, so I had the gist of it, co-ordination wise.” And she is from Canada, a nation notoriously good at skating. “That’s more ice-skating, but, yes, obviously I’d skated on ice since I was little. Other than that, though, I was pretty miserable at it and I had to train a lot. I had an amazing trainer, too, called Axles of Evil! We’re really good friends and she and I still skate together.”

A native of Halifax, Nova Scotia, Page grew up in a happy household, the daughter of Martha Philpotts, a teacher, and Dennis Page, a graphic designer.

“I’ve always been a bit of a tomboy, really, and I grew up playing sports all the time, so I already had the athletic will in me which was great for Whip It.” At high school in Halifax, Page proved herself an able footballer (or soccer-player to use her parlance).

“That was the main sport that I played pretty competitively but then when I got to 16-17, my acting career was just taking me away too much so I had to make a choice not to play any more.” Does she support a team? “I am not a huge sports watcher but I love playing; I still kick the ball around once in a while and I play badminton. I play with my father.”

Her acting career, which took off in her mid to late-teens, began with school plays, before she secured her first job on camera at the age of 10, in CBC TV movie Pit Pony, which led to roles in a number of small Canadian films and TV series.

At 16, she shot her first European movie, Mouth to Mouth, and a year later earned a string of glowing notices for her complex, haunting performance in 2005’s Hard Candy, the story of a dark encounter between a sexual predator and a 14-year-old girl, who ends up castrating him. She also appeared in X-Men: The Last Stand as Kitty Pryde, a girl who can walk through walls.

“Nova Scotia is still home for me, and I spend a lot of time there when I don’t work but also a lot of time in LA. It is the best of both worlds. But there did come a time when I had to leave and leaving Halifax led to more opportunities.”

Her biggest opportunity came with Juno, a comedy-drama directed by Jason Reitman (who received four Oscar nominations for last year’s Up in the Air), in which Page plays the eponymous lead, an independent-minded teenager confronting an unplanned pregnancy. Juno earned its star performer an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress (she lost out to Marion Cotillard for La Vie En Rose).

“The whole Juno experience was very thrilling because I love what I do and the success that represents and all the control I now have to navigate my career,” she says. “A lot of actors just try desperately to work, so the position I am in is a huge gift. But it is a definitely a transition in my life especially as a young woman to now have that kind of exposure. I keep things in perspective though. I just try my best to stay grounded and I think I am lucky because my interests stray from the stereo-typical interests of young actresses.”

Indeed, Page is a quiet girl, who lives her life far away from the hurly-burly of the Hollywood social scene, and we are unlikely see pictures of her falling out of a taxicab. An online search for information about her love life isn’t revealing. In 2008, it was rumoured Page was gay, although she proceeded to poke fun at the suggestion with a comedy sketch on hit US TV show Saturday Night Live in March of that year. Whatever the truth of that rumour, Page herself is not one to judge other people.

“A lot of people in their twenties go out and party,” she notes, “and it is just unfortunate that a lot of people who work in this industry have their pictures taken these days. I have a lot of friends who are older who I am sure when they were 22 if they had been photographed every Saturday night doing what they did, I am sure they would not have the career they have now.

“But I would never judge anybody for doing that because everybody is exploring and being curious.” She laughs. “It’s just that I am an old lady. I write and I hike. That is how I have fun.” And yet, beneath her soft, rather wholesome, exterior, Page is clearly strong-willed and emanates a steely determination. “When I am passionate about something I am absolutely full on,” she concedes. “I would like to think that most people are and that most young women are. I think it is a matter of finding that thing that really gets your blood pumping and gets your mind going.”

Those perfectionist strivings are reflected in her work. After Whip It, she’ll return to the cinema this year with Peacock, a psychological thriller in which she stars alongside Cillian Murphy and Susan Sarandon, and then ­opposite Leonardo DiCaprio in the eagerly awaited Inception, the next science-fiction blockbuster from the Dark Knight director Christopher Nolan.

The latter has been wrapped in mystery throughout production, although the early footage that screened at Showest, the US film industry trade-show in March, unravelled a story about men that invade people’s mind via their dreams. It’s taken Nolan a decade to hone his story.

Page stars as Ariadne, a name that hints at the part she might play (in Greek mythology, Ariadne furnishes Theseus with the ball of string that guides him out of the Minotaur’s lair) but she is pretty much sworn to secrecy. “It is so bad what I can and cannot talk about,” she says. “Chris Nolan is so magnificent, though, and working with him is such an absolute joy. To shoot a movie for that length of time, which I am not really used to, on such a vast scale, it was so exciting. I’m as excited as anyone to see the final product.”

And what ambitions remain for her? She’s already enjoyed so much success. She likes to write, but would she, like Barrymore, hope to step behind the camera one day? “I sometimes fantasise about it but I am also incredibly overwhelmed by the task, especially watching the directors I have become close to while I have been filming and seeing everything that’s involved. Right now I am very interested in writing. I am just trying to explore; that’s my mission.”

Whip It (12A) is in cinemas on Wednesday.

Source: www.heraldscotland.com
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Apr 08, 2010 12:29 am

These interviews are cool. However they do kind of suggest that Ellen's in London again and still hasn't notified me! :mad2:
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Apr 09, 2010 3:32 pm

Seems like she may be in the UK - another great interview for Whip It by David Jenkins for Time Out (London): http://www.timeout.com/film/features/sh ... ip-it.html
Ellen Page on 'Whip It'

Ellen Page goes from beauty queen to roller derby icon in Drew Barrymore's directorial debut, 'Whip It'. David Jenkins spoke to her about the role
Born and raised in Canada, 23-year-old Ellen Page made her breakthrough as a child taking violent revenge on a paedophile in ‘Hard Candy’ before charming the world as a young mother-to-be in ‘Juno’. With ‘Whip It’ (the directorial debut of Drew Barrymore) she stars as a roller-derby star who keeps her secret life from her parents.

How did you originally get involved in ‘Whip It’?
‘I think Drew Barrymore had me in mind. One of the producers approached me about it when I was at Sundance a few years back. She told me that it was about underground roller derby and I found that extremely interesting. Then she mentioned that Drew was going to direct it, and I just got stupidly excited.’

How good was your skating before ‘Whip It’? Was it a case of taking the old Barbie skates on to the streets?
‘I’m not the kind of girl that ever owned Barbie skates, I have to admit.’

Not even ironically?
‘Oh yeah. I own a pair now because I’m such a fucking hipster. No, I wasn’t a very good skater, but growing up, all I did was play sports, so at least I had that athleticism in me and that lack of fear. I had never been on roller skates before but I had an amazing trainer called Axles of Evil and it took me three, four months to get pretty good.’

In the film you have an underwater love scene. How do you prepare for that?
‘It’s definitely… difficult. I really liked the idea and I trusted Drew. Physically it was a little tiring, but it was nice to do something different. Don’t get me wrong, there was no sub-aqua training or anything like that – it was a case of “jump in the pool and let’s get this thing done”. I love that kind of filmmaking.’

Do you watch a lot of films?
‘I go through phases. I recently saw an amazing documentary about an endurance swimmer from Slovakia called “Big River Man”. I don’t know why I responded to it so much, but I did.’

When you’re watching a good film, do you take mental notes with a view to maybe working with the director?
‘Oh yes, very much so. When I saw “Big River Man” I went straightaway and emailed the director just because I wanted to tell him why I liked it.’

Did you get a response?
‘Yes, I did. And I got kinda starstruck. There was a bit on the end of it, too, which said, “Is this the actress Ellen Page?” which was very cute.’

You’re in Christopher Nolan’s new film, ‘Inception’. Have you seen it yet?
‘No, and I don’t know if it’s wrong to be as excited as other people down to the fact that I’m in it, but I’m very eager to.’

As a director, how does Drew Barrymore compare to Chris Nolan?
‘Well, every film is a different experience and all directors work differently, just as all actors work differently. But, there was a lot more time and space on “Inception”. Working with Chris is such a pleasure because you’re shooting a movie on this grand scale. He’s a filmmaker because he loves films: there’s just no ego with him. He has some of that dry British wit, too, which I didn’t quite get at first, but learned to love.’

Would you like to write or direct?
‘I’m writing a TV show that HBO bought. As of now it’s called “Stitch N’ Bitch” and it stars Alia Shawkat and Sean Tillmann (aka Har Mar Superstar).’

Is it about knitting?
‘No, it has to do with hipsters in East LA, though knitting could fall into that category. The title actually refers to the band at the centre of it. We all went to Amsterdam to write the pilot which was magical superfun.’
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Apr 09, 2010 7:26 pm

Ellen Page was featured on this months (April 2010) Cover of Halifax's Free Magazine called Faces. There is an Exclusive interview:
http://www.facesmagazine.ca/April2010/
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http://www.facesmagazine.ca/April2010/
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Apr 09, 2010 8:32 pm

Ellen Page was featured on this months (April 2010) Cover of Halifax's Free Magazine called Faces. There is an Exclusive interview:
http://www.facesmagazine.ca/April2010/
Thanks so much for posting Kevin - learned some fresh things about Ellen. Two dogs - Julie and Sprout - still wondering about Patti though.
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Apr 09, 2010 8:38 pm

JimH wrote:Seems like she may be in the UK - another great interview for Whip It by David Jenkins for Time Out (London)
I highly doubt she is in the UK at the moment. On the one hand there was no big movie premiere or something and on the other hand I've learned via Twitter that a Novelist from the NY Times did an interview with her in NYC today :)
Kevin Kumar-Misir wrote:Ellen Page was featured on this months (April 2010) Cover of Halifax's Free Magazine called Faces. There is an Exclusive interview:[...]
Thanks for posting this, Kevin! :super: I would greatly appreciate if a Haligonian would be willing to pick up a print copy for me :sweating2: :happyhappy: :yellowhappy:
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Apr 10, 2010 2:22 am

Thanks for posting this, Kevin! :super: I would greatly appreciate if a Haligonian would be willing to pick up a print copy for me :sweating2: :happyhappy: :yellowhappy:
haha you know what, I was actually thinking about you at the time I got it today and I picked up an extra copy!, I can mail it to you soon. I still have your mailing address from the prize I won a while back, So expect it soon! :yellowhappy:
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Apr 10, 2010 5:24 am

Thanks for posting Kevin :super:

Definitely one of my fave Ellen interviews....and I love that they used her photo from that Daniel Craig movie premiere (cant remember the name of the movie...drat)

Writing the script of her new show, with Alia and HarMar in Amsterdam.....hmm....wonder if they worte in any of those "cafes" :biggrin: That show is gonna be funny and interesting...

And, a big thing to get on the cover of the local Haligonian magazine....especially after Sidney Crosby became King of Canada after his overtime goal in the Gold Medal hockey game against the USA......Haligonian Homegirl punks Haligonian Homeboy :biggrin:

This article made my day :)
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Apr 11, 2010 10:09 am

UCFRdWarrior wrote:
Definitely one of my fave Ellen interviews....and I love that they used her photo from that Daniel Craig movie premiere (cant remember the name of the movie...drat)
The movie is called Defiance... and it was really good ^_^
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Apr 11, 2010 5:42 pm

Ellen Page talks films, feminism and fame in Hollywood
by
Dorothy Snarker

When last we saw Ellen Page here in the states she was strapping on some skates and straddling Drew Barrymore. Or, as I like to call in my daydreams, just another average Tuesday. But now that her roller derby flick Whip It is finally coming to the United Kingdom, she is talking again about the film, feminism and being famous.

The 23-year-old star spoke with the Guardian (and wore some bunny ears — just in time for Easter).

On if she was like Bliss Cavendar when she was a teenager:

To a certain extent. I am from a small town — Halifax, Nova Scotia — and when I was 16 I finished school, moved to Toronto, started working and experienced all the freedom that Bliss is yearning for. But the funny thing for me is that now, age 23, I'm back home and this is where I feel the most grounded and the most myself. I'm loving it, trying to squeeze as much out of the orange as I can. It usually happens to people much later in life, this return to your roots, but I guess I started out earlier than most.

On her new-found fame since Juno:

That was a big turning point for me. It was very unexpected. I was used to doing small, low-budget films and this just happened to be one small low-budget film that more than 100 people saw. I found it very strange to be suddenly talking about myself all the time and to be followed down the street. But it's been a huge gift too. To be in a position, at my age, where I am financially independent, I can help develop things, I can promote stuff that I believe in, I can say no a lot and spend time writing — that is a gift. I'm also exploring projects that interest me outside the film industry.

On the controversy created by Juno:

I was like, "You know what? You all need to calm down." People are so black and white about this. Because she kept the baby everybody said the film was against abortion. But if she'd had an abortion everybody would have been like, "Oh my God." I am a feminist and I am totally pro-choice, but what's funny is when you say that people assume that you are pro-abortion. I don't love abortion but I want women to be able to choose and I don't want white dudes in an office being able to make laws on things like this. I mean what are we going to do — go back to clothes hangers?

On the pressure of being perfect in Hollywood:

I hate to admit it but, yeah. I definitely feel more of a sense of personal insecurity. I really try and smarten up when I feel that way but sometimes it does get to me. The fact is, young girls are bombarded by advertisements and magazines full of delusional expectations that encourage people to like themselves less and then they want to buy more things. It is really sad and it encourages the consumerist cycle. Boys used to have it slightly easier but I think they are now getting more of the same kind of pressure. Look at all the guys in junior high who think they should have a six-pack.

On women’s treatment in entertainment:

I think it's a total drag. I've been lucky to get interesting parts but there are still not that many out there for women. And everybody is so critical of women. If there's a movie starring a man that tanks, then I don't see an article about the fact that the movie starred a man and that must be why it bombed. Then a film comes out where a woman is in the lead, or a movie comes out where a bunch of girls are roller derbying, and it doesn't make much money and you see articles about how women can't carry a film.

On what she’d do if she wasn’t acting:

I'm very interested in psychology. For a while I thought seriously about becoming a therapist for troubled children. Psychology is not too dissimilar to acting, I always think.

Ellen always comes across so smart and engaged in her interviews. Knowing that thoughtful, articulate young women like her are helping to shape the next generation of women in film makes me hopeful for the future.


Posted April,6, by Dorothy Snarker
http://www.afterellen.com/blog/dorothys ... -hollywood
""Judging people you don't know for things you can't understand is just really stupid"
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UCFRdWarrior
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Apr 12, 2010 5:58 am

angie wrote:
UCFRdWarrior wrote:
Definitely one of my fave Ellen interviews....and I love that they used her photo from that Daniel Craig movie premiere (cant remember the name of the movie...drat)
The movie is called Defiance... and it was really good ^_^

Thanks Angie....My brain was not working real well when I posted :D Thanks :)
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Apr 12, 2010 4:22 pm

Kevin Kumar-Misir wrote:haha you know what, I was actually thinking about you at the time I got it today and I picked up an extra copy!, I can mail it to you soon. I still have your mailing address from the prize I won a while back, So expect it soon! :yellowhappy:
Fanstastic! :applause: I knew I can count on you and it's great (and much appreciated) when someone shows some initiative. :loveforever:
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JimH
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Apr 17, 2010 2:42 pm

Hello in Japanese means $9,000 for kids in Page ad http://thechronicleherald.ca/Front/1177700.html

So this is a reminder of the benefits to the local folks appearing in the CISCO ads with Ellen :)
LUNENBURG — Bryden Myra plans to buy himself a brand new mountain bike and he’s going to pick one up for his sister Bromlyn too.

After all, what are a few hundred bucks to a kid who just raked in a few thousand?

Bryden, 8, is one of more than two dozen little Donald Trumps running around Lunenburg these days.

Parents of the Grade 3 students at Lunenburg Academy were shocked to leave the post office Monday with cheques for their kids totalling nearly $9,000 each.

"I thought for sure this was a scam," Bryden’s dad Jamie Myra said Friday.

But it turns out the cheques are legitimate and the bank will have them in the kids’ accounts by the middle of next week. .............................................
Each moment is an opportunity to make a fresh start. (Pema Chodron)
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UCFRdWarrior
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Apr 17, 2010 3:35 pm

Thanks for posting Jim!

Ellen made a lot of kids happy in Lunenburg :) Wonder how much the little girl made for "we're going on a field trip to China" :biggrin:

Gosh, for 9,000 Canadian dollars....I would even say the name of that Volcano in Iceland :biggrin: (easy for Gunnar to say....but for us non-Icelanders...well, a little tough) :biggrin:

(Did not want to spoil the joy of the article....but the kids were speaking Chinese...."Ni hao" is Chinese.....Japanese would be "Konichi wa") :wink:
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Apr 17, 2010 4:42 pm

Thanks UCFRdWarrior:
(Did not want to spoil the joy of the article....but the kids were speaking Chinese...."Ni hao" is Chinese.....Japanese would be "Konichi wa")
Yes, thats right I didn't notice that till you pointed it out. I just e-mailed the author to set it straight :yellowink:
Each moment is an opportunity to make a fresh start. (Pema Chodron)
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