Ellen on Bio-chemical waste

Topics about the great Canadian actress
User avatar

Topic author
Kevin Kumar-Misir
Potential EP Fan
Potential EP Fan
Posts: 25
Joined: Aug 18, 2009 8:41 pm
Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia
Status: Offline

Aug 17, 2010 12:21 am

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/nova-scotia/st ... lifax.html

I have to say I totally agree with Ellen in that It was wrong to use this spray. I am personally effected by the Bio-Chem Spray that they used right down the street from me. The stink is unbearable and the area where they used it now looks highly unnatural, its a weird shade of green grass. I've personally seen them spray the ground with this 'fertilizer' and was totally unaware of at the time the smell and effect it would have on the community that I live in. They should have put notice out.
It is really gross to think that this is industrial waste.

Kevin Kumar-Misir
User avatar

JimH
Benefactor
Benefactor
Posts: 666
Joined: Sep 08, 2009 2:55 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Status: Offline

Aug 17, 2010 12:45 am

Dominik is going to get the video of Ellen being interviewed by the CBC on this, so we should have her comments posted tomorrow.
http://board.ellen-page.net/viewtopic.p ... &start=120

It seems important to make a distinction between this "bio-chemical waste" or "sewage sludge" and compost which she has advocated in previous interviews.
Each moment is an opportunity to make a fresh start. (Pema Chodron)
User avatar

Topic author
Kevin Kumar-Misir
Potential EP Fan
Potential EP Fan
Posts: 25
Joined: Aug 18, 2009 8:41 pm
Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia
Status: Offline

Aug 17, 2010 2:55 am

Yes they should definitely Give Warning, have a vote, tell us what exactly it is always when they use this practice.

Off Topic- My mother seen her doing the interview right down the street from my place. I had missed her though. :haeh: Its insane how small Nova Scotia is.
User avatar

JimH
Benefactor
Benefactor
Posts: 666
Joined: Sep 08, 2009 2:55 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Status: Offline

Aug 17, 2010 3:48 am

Sounds like it's disgusting stuff to be spraying around. Here in Edmonton we stopped using 2,4 D on dandelions since it's not considered a nuisance weed. Of course people now complain about dandelions... Like you say, some community discussion and consensus would help resolve this. Also must be awesome to know that you could turn a corner and run into Ellen :yellowink:
Each moment is an opportunity to make a fresh start. (Pema Chodron)
User avatar

UCFRdWarrior
Must be a Haligonian
Must be a Haligonian
Posts: 2129
Joined: Nov 16, 2008 4:20 am
Location: Florida
Status: Offline

Aug 17, 2010 7:25 am

Good for Ellen to speak up....bio chem waste, reclaimed water is nasty smelling....here in Florida we deal with it everyday with all the irrigation and landscaping. More would complain here....however the well-water used by some stinks a whole lot worse....the natural water stinks like crap and is loaded with sulfur and phosphates....yuck :totallysick:

I was taken aback by some of the commenters on the site. If they knew anything, they would know Ellen is quite well versed on these type of issues...and its not some PR thing. Maybe she has some goat poop she can send some of them :biggrin:
Image
User avatar

HeartHer
Must be a Haligonian
Must be a Haligonian
Posts: 761
Joined: Jul 20, 2010 10:26 am
Location: Hermosa Beach, CA
Status: Offline

Aug 17, 2010 9:00 am

UCFRdWarrior wrote:Good for Ellen to speak up....bio chem waste, reclaimed water is nasty smelling....here in Florida we deal with it everyday with all the irrigation and landscaping. More would complain here....however the well-water used by some stinks a whole lot worse....the natural water stinks like crap and is loaded with sulfur and phosphates....yuck :totallysick:

I was taken aback by some of the commenters on the site. If they knew anything, they would know Ellen is quite well versed on these type of issues...and its not some PR thing. Maybe she has some goat poop she can send some of them :biggrin:
Yeah I was trying to respond to them, mention how she is actually pretty well educated in such matters and even learned a ton about permaculture in Oregon. But it wasn't worth the registration, some people just aren't worth the time, they are those people :longtongue: .

The whole idea is a bit sketch, and it doesn't sound entirely safe to me. Although it does beg the question, why's it justifiable in the first place? Is it a health risk? Maybe, maybe not, but no matter what it's definitely not worth the risk when they could use traditional compost. Is there any way to justify dumping something that smells like raw sewage all over a town? Absolutely not, the smell is reportedly nauseating and if the stench alone is making people feel sick using it should be completely out of the question. What benefits does it provide anyway?
User avatar

UCFRdWarrior
Must be a Haligonian
Must be a Haligonian
Posts: 2129
Joined: Nov 16, 2008 4:20 am
Location: Florida
Status: Offline

Aug 18, 2010 1:51 am

Localities try to re-use as much of the treated waste as possible, as it saves money on disposal and storage. If they can sell it to others for use, then it is off their hands.

Unfortunately such waste is smelly and nasty, and ends up causing more harm than it should.
Image
User avatar

HeartHer
Must be a Haligonian
Must be a Haligonian
Posts: 761
Joined: Jul 20, 2010 10:26 am
Location: Hermosa Beach, CA
Status: Offline

Aug 18, 2010 7:49 am

Pretty solid interview, I bet the people who mocked her opinion and laughed at the fact that it's even being taken seriously felt pretty stupid when they heard her say not once, but twice, "I'm not a scientist, just a concerned citizen."

It's good that this whole biosolid deal is being opposed right from the get go, if it had proved cost effective it could've spread quickly with little opposition. What's going on in Nova Scotia has no immediate effect on me but it's good to see their citizens taking a stand against a potentially dangerous and disgusting fertilizing material before it spread too far.

talkingraisin
Frequent Visitor
Frequent Visitor
Posts: 10
Joined: Jul 30, 2010 10:17 am
Status: Offline

Aug 19, 2010 5:22 am

I'm glad Ellen is using her voice to raise concern over this issue. Biosolids contain heavy metals such as arsenic, as well as toxic chemicals such as plasticizers and PDBEs (http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/cfr_2003/ ... 503.13.htm). Also, biosolids contain pathogens that can cause diseases if the biosolids aren't treated correctly. Read the abstract and conclusion of this report:

http://sludgenews.org/resources/documen ... son_NS.pdf

It seems that the use of sewage sludge has caused illness in residents nearby, and that the problem is poorly understood. In addition, there seems to be little enforcement of proper treatment of the biosolids, which leads to even more problems.

Do you trust your government enough that you can be sure the biosolids used on your front lawn is properly treated? Even if it is, can you be certain it won't be a health risk, given it is so poorly understood? These are big risks to take, and the government definitely should have involved the citizens before making a decision.
User avatar

Dominik
Webmaster
Webmaster
Posts: 1067
Joined: Nov 14, 2008 12:23 am
Location: Baden-Baden
Contact:
Status: Offline

Aug 24, 2010 11:52 pm

I know that the topic is very serious, but here's a "funny" side note:

Greg Guy, Senior Communications Officer of CBC Nova Scotia, posted this message on Twitter today:

[html]<img src="http://i34.tinypic.com/34q66np.jpg" style="border:1px solid gray"></img>[/html]

If you follow the link http://bit.ly/bpDFB0, you can watch the CBC interview on Youtube.
Now guess where this uploaded video was taken from :laugh: I'm really wondering why he didn't post a link to the video on cbc.ca :completeangel:
There's nothing to fear, nothing to doubt.
Nothing is true, everything is permitted.
User avatar

JimH
Benefactor
Benefactor
Posts: 666
Joined: Sep 08, 2009 2:55 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Status: Offline

Aug 25, 2010 12:20 am

Dominik wrote: If you follow the link http://bit.ly/bpDFB0, you can watch the CBC interview on Youtube.
Now guess where this uploaded video was taken from :laugh: I'm really wondering why he didn't post a link to the video on cbc.ca :completeangel:
I realize I am going :offtopic: but I'd like to get this off my chest. Of course it's been taken from EPO - there's a huge amount of Ellen related video on Youtube that's been ripped off from EPO. There's usually no credit given to the source. It really p**ses me off, so I imagine you must be annoyed too, Dominik :veryangry:
Each moment is an opportunity to make a fresh start. (Pema Chodron)
User avatar

Dominik
Webmaster
Webmaster
Posts: 1067
Joined: Nov 14, 2008 12:23 am
Location: Baden-Baden
Contact:
Status: Offline

Aug 25, 2010 10:07 am

JimH wrote:I realize I am going :offtopic: but I'd like to get this off my chest. Of course it's been taken from EPO - there's a huge amount of Ellen related video on Youtube that's been ripped off from EPO. There's usually no credit given to the source. It really p**ses me off, so I imagine you must be annoyed too, Dominik :veryangry:
Thanks for bringing this up, Jim. But you know what? I'm so over it already. There's nothing you can do to stop this and it's just the usual behaviour of the Twitter/Facebook/Youtube generation. They have no respect for the work of others and grab everything they can find on the internet. Besides, "Videos <> Youtube" is the one thing, "Images <> Tumblr" the other :rolleye: Anyway, back to topic!
There's nothing to fear, nothing to doubt.
Nothing is true, everything is permitted.
User avatar

Joro
EP - Beginner
EP - Beginner
Posts: 65
Joined: Jul 17, 2010 10:03 am
Location: Cologne, Germany
Status: Offline

Aug 25, 2010 2:15 pm

Well, you can watermark the materials, for example?
It's not that I don't try being polite, it's just that I fail most of the time.
User avatar

Dominik
Webmaster
Webmaster
Posts: 1067
Joined: Nov 14, 2008 12:23 am
Location: Baden-Baden
Contact:
Status: Offline

Sep 28, 2010 8:33 pm

Joro wrote:Well, you can watermark the materials, for example?
Did you take a look at the gallery or watch a video from EPO recently? I watermark all videos and images with a EPO tag line. But unlike other sites I don't put it in the middle of the photo for example. I prefer to use a nearly transparent writing at the top and the bottom of each images. And people, who are reposting stuff on Tumblr & Co, simply cut them off and resize the pic to "hide the source" :rolleye: Again, I don't want to make a drama out of it. Let's move on with the real topic of this thread topic.
[Update] Update - 09/28/2010
Here's an update on this topic:

Biosolids fertilizer is safe: HRM staff
published on Tuesday, September 28, 2010 - 7:46 AM AT

A new report from city staff defends the use of biosolids as fertilizer for landscaping and forestry projects in the Halifax Regional Municipality. It recommends the continued use of biosolids for landscaping and tree planting. The report also states that the material is safe and won't smell if it's handled properly. But Downtown Coun. Dawn Sloane is not convinced, and she hopes another study will mean the material is burned rather than spread. People who live near Dunbrack Street in Clayton Park found out in early August that the city was using treated sewage sludge as fertilizer. There was a powerful stink from the newly seeded boulevard.

Biosolids were also used to fertilize newly-planted trees in Halifax's popular Point Pleasant Park. Councillors were upset because they had no idea the material was being spread in urban areas and asked staff for a written explanation. Sloane said Monday that downtown residents are not interested in having biosolids used in their neighbourhoods. "We have a lot of community gardens within the downtown core. The individuals I've talked to want to keep things organic and do not want to include this whatsoever," she said.

Sloane is more enthusiastic about potentially burning sewage sludge as fuel. That idea is being investigated by Halifax Water, a research company and the operators of the biosolids plant, said Richard MacLellan, HRM's manager of environmental sustainability. "Premlinary results are very promising. There's more testing happening. So that's a potential solution we could be able to realize in 12 to 24 months," he said. MacLellan said a separate report on biosolids as fuel should be ready in a couple of months.

Meanwhile a debate on biosolids that was scheduled to take place this week at council has been delayed. In August, actress Ellen Page, a native of Halifax, was among those speaking out against the use of biosolids. "To be honest, I think biosolids are kind of an Orwellian term. I refer to it as 'sewage sludge,'" she told CBC News. "It's taking industrial waste, waste from hospitals, businesses, households, full of man-made chemicals, highly toxic, proven carcinogens, radioactive material, and they're putting it on our soil. They're putting it into our ecosystem."

City officials said the sludge is processed to remove harmful chemicals and pathogens.

Source: www.cbc.ca
There's nothing to fear, nothing to doubt.
Nothing is true, everything is permitted.

studnothin
Potential EP Fan
Potential EP Fan
Posts: 28
Joined: Dec 21, 2008 9:40 pm
Status: Offline

Sep 29, 2010 12:16 am

I may be oversimplifying the matter as I don't fully understand the usage and distribution rights of intellectual property over the internet, but doesn't this "type" of quarreling over who has the right to post what one person merely uploaded seem rather unwarranted? I'm certainly not discounting the time and effort put into organizing and cataloguing for information-gathering purposes, and they should definitely be credited, but why is that some people take it so personally as though they were the original author? And just for clarity, I'm not implying this of this site's author, it's just an observation I've made while lurking about different sites and I'm curious as to how quickly that sense of entitlement tends to escalate in these matters.
Though, I don't know how well a crushed lunchbox with a spear through it would work...
User avatar

HeartHer
Must be a Haligonian
Must be a Haligonian
Posts: 761
Joined: Jul 20, 2010 10:26 am
Location: Hermosa Beach, CA
Status: Offline

Sep 29, 2010 12:24 am

Dominik wrote:
Joro wrote:Well, you can watermark the materials, for example?
Did you take a look at the gallery or watch a video from EPO recently? I watermark all videos and images with a EPO tag line. But unlike other sites I don't put it in the middle of the photo for example. I prefer to use a nearly transparent writing at the top and the bottom of each images. And people, who are reposting stuff on Tumblr & Co, simply cut them off and resize the pic to "hide the source" :rolleye: Again, I don't want to make a drama out of it. Let's move on with the real topic of this thread topic.
[Update] Update - 09/28/2010
Here's an update on this topic:

Biosolids fertilizer is safe: HRM staff
published on Tuesday, September 28, 2010 - 7:46 AM AT

A new report from city staff defends the use of biosolids as fertilizer for landscaping and forestry projects in the Halifax Regional Municipality. It recommends the continued use of biosolids for landscaping and tree planting. The report also states that the material is safe and won't smell if it's handled properly. But Downtown Coun. Dawn Sloane is not convinced, and she hopes another study will mean the material is burned rather than spread. People who live near Dunbrack Street in Clayton Park found out in early August that the city was using treated sewage sludge as fertilizer. There was a powerful stink from the newly seeded boulevard.

Biosolids were also used to fertilize newly-planted trees in Halifax's popular Point Pleasant Park. Councillors were upset because they had no idea the material was being spread in urban areas and asked staff for a written explanation. Sloane said Monday that downtown residents are not interested in having biosolids used in their neighbourhoods. "We have a lot of community gardens within the downtown core. The individuals I've talked to want to keep things organic and do not want to include this whatsoever," she said.

Sloane is more enthusiastic about potentially burning sewage sludge as fuel. That idea is being investigated by Halifax Water, a research company and the operators of the biosolids plant, said Richard MacLellan, HRM's manager of environmental sustainability. "Premlinary results are very promising. There's more testing happening. So that's a potential solution we could be able to realize in 12 to 24 months," he said. MacLellan said a separate report on biosolids as fuel should be ready in a couple of months.

Meanwhile a debate on biosolids that was scheduled to take place this week at council has been delayed. In August, actress Ellen Page, a native of Halifax, was among those speaking out against the use of biosolids. "To be honest, I think biosolids are kind of an Orwellian term. I refer to it as 'sewage sludge,'" she told CBC News. "It's taking industrial waste, waste from hospitals, businesses, households, full of man-made chemicals, highly toxic, proven carcinogens, radioactive material, and they're putting it on our soil. They're putting it into our ecosystem."

City officials said the sludge is processed to remove harmful chemicals and pathogens.

Source: http://www.cbc.ca
I think they are missing two key points when they say it's safe:

1) No filtering is perfect. They can process the sludge as much as they want but it's impossible to completely separate the good from the bad. Although water is very different than sludge, let's use it as an example. Imagine you have a bottle of swamp water and a bottle of fresh spring water. You can filter them thousands of times but the swamp water is still going to be contaminated, it can't reach the same state of purification that spring water can. I don't think they are processing the sludge thousands of times either so I'm sure plenty is getting left in.

2) It has a disgusting stench which is a nuisance for all people with functioning noses, and the fumes are making some people sick. Even if nothing in the sludge is directly causing illness its smell is making people feel sick. Is this really worth significantly lowering the quality of life? Forget that actually, does anyone expect a town with such a horrid stench to be able to survive? Nova Scotia is a beautiful place which I'm sure attracts plenty of tourism, who would want to visit a town that smells like excrement?

Just my 2 cents... each one's a cent I guess :sassy: .
Last edited by HeartHer on Sep 29, 2010 9:32 am, edited 2 times in total.
User avatar

Dominik
Webmaster
Webmaster
Posts: 1067
Joined: Nov 14, 2008 12:23 am
Location: Baden-Baden
Contact:
Status: Offline

Oct 28, 2010 2:17 pm

studnothin wrote:I may be oversimplifying the matter as I don't fully understand the usage and distribution rights of intellectual property over the internet, but doesn't this "type" of quarreling over who has the right to post what one person merely uploaded seem rather unwarranted? I'm certainly not discounting the time and effort put into organizing and cataloguing for information-gathering purposes, and they should definitely be credited, but why is that some people take it so personally as though they were the original author? And just for clarity, I'm not implying this of this site's author, it's just an observation I've made while lurking about different sites and I'm curious as to how quickly that sense of entitlement tends to escalate in these matters.
First off, this is totally off topic, like the above posting by studnothin.

Like I said I don't want to make a drama out of it since I can't change anything. However, it is still annoying if people steal the work of others without crediting them. It's like making a reproduction of the Mona Lisa and telling the world that I've painted it :rolleye: Also don't underestimate the time factor. It only takes seconds to cut tags and repost an image on Tumblr, but the person who originally posted it could spent hours finding it. Is it asked too much to credit him and show some appreciation for his efforts?! And if I make scans of a magazine or paper - which takes me a lot of time either - I am in fact the "original author" of the image though I didn't write the scanned article. But I don't expect people who never take the time to put up an own website to understand that.
[Update] Update - 10/28/2010
Rising in defence of province’s soil
Page pairs up with MacPherson to oppose biosolid use
By LAURA FRASER Staff Reporter
Thu, Oct 28 - 7:20 AM


As the co-owner of the Wooden Monkey restaurant, Lil MacPherson has literally made good food her business. Her passion lies in providing fresh, locally grown fare.

Now, she finds herself evolving into a soil activist, a sentinel of Nova Scotia’s agricultural land.

"Food is the most beautiful thing in the world," she says. "It’s our community, it’s our heritage (and) it’s our culture. We have to protect it."

She has just returned from a slow-food conference in Torino, Italy, so she apologizes for her mental jet lag. But she warms right up to her subject, speaking more quickly with each sentence.

MacPherson and Halifax actress Ellen Page are mounting an impassioned defence of this province’s soil, each seeking to keep it free of treated sewage sludge. The pair began their unofficial campaign in August, when citizens in Halifax Regional Municipality learned that the city had begun spreading biosolids on public land on Dunbrack Street.

"I think we have a chance in Nova Scotia to be leaders in this country and the world and (biosolids) is not the way to do it," MacPherson said.

"We’ve lost two-thirds of the soil (due to development) and it’s very, very important (because) it sustains all life on this earth. Before we throw (biosolids) on there, before we destroy it, we have to have more testing."

The duo will host a public screening of Sludge Diet, a Quebec documentary about the effects of municipal biosolids on agriculture, at Park Lane in Halifax on Nov. 7 at 7 p.m.

Nova Scotia currently allows municipal biosolids to be used as fertilizer on certain agricultural land. The sewage can contain small amounts of chemicals like arsenic, cobalt, lead and copper, but only in what the province deems acceptable levels.

Each of the provinces and territories has legislation regulating their use. The United States also uses treated waste on its agricultural lands.

But critics of the practice say there has been no extensive testing to establish whether there are long-term effects from eating food grown in the reclaimed waste.

MacPherson said it would be nearly impossible to test for all of the possible chemicals that could enter the municipal sewage system and then effectively be mixed with the soil and groundwater.

"Every sick person in the hospital, every sick, diseased person, everything they flush down that toilet goes into that system, every chemical, every hormone," she said.

"It’s impossible, absolutely impossible, to measure that. We’re just playing with fire and I don’t want to play with it. It’s too important."

The chairwoman for the Nova Scotia Biosolids Caucus citizens’ group opposes the use of biosolids on agricultural farmland. Marilyn Cameron agreed that other manure and pesticide products can also contain chemicals but said those face stricter regulations.

"We have really stringent rules for drug withdrawals before dairy cattle or beef cattle go to market," she said.

"We don’t use growth hormones here in Nova Scotia . . . so I think that’s a lot safer alternative for food than putting the big unknown on agricultural land."

Others worry about the smell.

Coun. Debbie Hum (Rockingham-Wentworth) was besieged by calls in August complaining about the stench coming from the Dunbrack Street area after biosolids were spread on public land.

Hum said she’s awaiting the report from municipal staff about the future use of the treated effluent but has her own reservations about the practice. She plans to attend the film screening and what she hopes will be a lively public debate.

"The feedback I got immediately following the (Dunbrack Street) incident was not only from local residents (but) also right across the province and, in fact, right across the country," she said.

"I raise the same concerns. I’m not quite convinced that its use is an appropriate one."

Source: thechronicleherald.ca
There's nothing to fear, nothing to doubt.
Nothing is true, everything is permitted.
User avatar

JimH
Benefactor
Benefactor
Posts: 666
Joined: Sep 08, 2009 2:55 am
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Status: Offline

Oct 28, 2010 3:11 pm

Dominik wrote: MacPherson and Halifax actress Ellen Page are mounting an impassioned defence of this province’s soil, each seeking to keep it free of treated sewage sludge. The pair began their unofficial campaign in August, when citizens in Halifax Regional Municipality learned that the city had begun spreading biosolids on public land on Dunbrack Street.


The duo will host a public screening of Sludge Diet, a Quebec documentary about the effects of municipal biosolids on agriculture, at Park Lane in Halifax on Nov. 7 at 7 p.m.


Source: thechronicleherald.ca
Ellen is continuing her activism for her hometown, as she promised. A little more information about the film "Sludge Diet" is here: http://eng.cinefete.ca/index.php?option ... &Itemid=36
Each moment is an opportunity to make a fresh start. (Pema Chodron)
User avatar

AddisonTea
True Ellen Page Fan
True Ellen Page Fan
Posts: 166
Joined: Jun 09, 2010 5:29 pm
Status: Offline

Oct 28, 2010 10:24 pm

All this and they won't legalize pot.
User avatar

HeartHer
Must be a Haligonian
Must be a Haligonian
Posts: 761
Joined: Jul 20, 2010 10:26 am
Location: Hermosa Beach, CA
Status: Offline

Oct 29, 2010 1:27 am

AddisonTea wrote:All this and they won't legalize pot.
:eek:

Huh? There's a missing link in the path to this comment. In California we might legalize it soon. I hope we do, not because we I smoke (I never have, never will) but because the government can tax and regulate it which would greatly help California's huge debt problem.

Good to see she's still pursuing this though, I really hope they make a big enough stink (or I guess the whole point of this is to get rid of a big stink soooo) that companies are afraid to spread the use of such soil to other places.
Post Reply